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Search engine optimisation

Search engine optimisation (10)

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) and all other blogs relating to improving your website's visibility in the search engines.

Overview – pinging for indexing and extra traffic

In other SEO strategies we employ, like press release submission, we create backlinks pointing to our client’s website which help them rank better in Google’s results pages.  Google however may take some time to find these new links or may not find them at all. If Google doesn’t find and index these links they will give our client’s website no benefit.

This is a simple, fast and powerful way to get backlinks from websites that Google considers authoritative.

There are a number of websites out there that contain domain statistics about  other websites. They list information such as ip address domain age, date of registration or the page title and metadata.

More importantly these site include a backlink to the site they contain information on.  Below is some information about www.swaysearch.com on the meta site www.howismysite.com (http://howismysite.com/swaysearch-com).

It is common knowledge that having duplicate meta descriptions for different page in your website can harm your SEO efforts. If you are using the Kunena forum component for Joomla! you may have noticed this can create duplicate meta descriptions that will appear in Google Webmaster tools.

Avoiding duplicate meta descriptions on your website is desirable thing for your SEO efforts. If you are using JReviews you may have found that you are getting duplicate meta description errors in Google Webmaster tools.

For JReviews you can configure the title and meta data for each List Type. From within the JReviews component select List types Manager (under setup JReviews) you will see the list types you have created i.e. Mobile Phone, Radio, Recommended suppliers etc.
 

If you use this Joomla! component you may well find that you have many duplicate meta descriptions entries.

To see if this is the case go to your Google webmaster tools (if you don’t have an account you should get one). Select the website under investigation. Click on the Diagnostics menu item on the dashboard and then HTML suggestions from the submenu. On this page you will see a section for Duplicate meta descriptions – click on this link to view a detail reports of any pages with have duplicate meta descriptions.

OK, so you’ve identified the keywords and phrases that you want to compete for in the search engines. You’ve assessed these and think you’ll get a decent volume of quality traffic from them and that you have a fair chance of competing.

So what next?

The next stage of the process is onpage (or onsite) optimisation. This involves tweaking your web pages to make full use of the keywords you’ve selected.

The last few blog posts have been looking at the tools and science behind finding and evaluating the keywords to optimise your website around. Unfortunately search engine optimisation isn’t a science. In this blog we’ll look at how using a solid marketing approach to finding keywords will help you identify what your customers are really searching for.

The first thing you’ll need to do is ditch the analytics hat and dig out your marketing hat. In essence keyword research is a similar process to that used by marketers – you’re trying to understand the messages that attract customers. Marketing is all about delivering the right message at the right time to the right person for the lowest possible cost. What you’re trying to do with your keywords is deliver the right keyword to the right prospect when they’re in the right phase of the buying cycle. By using the natural search engine results you’ll be doing this at the lowest possible cost anyway.

In the last article we looked at the benefits of using long tail keywords to give you the best possible chance of topping the search engine rankings. This time we look at how you research – and evaluate – these keywords.

There is a huge array of tools available to evaluate keywords, some free and some paid for. By far the most powerful (and free) of all these is the Google Keyword Tool (http://www.googlekeywordtool.com/). This is the tool that is used to identify keywords for running Google Adwords (the adverts you see at the top and right hand side of the organic search results).

This is part of a series of articles we’ll be running into search engine optimisation. This part looks at how to find killer keywords that will give you a real chance of topping the search engines. Follow the blog by clicking on the RSS feed at the top of the page to keep up to date with all the SEO blog posts.

Any search engine optimisation project must start with understanding what search terms you want to be found for in the search engines. Without a thorough understanding of what your potential customers are searching for you don’t know what to optimise your website around. Good keywords – although please be aware that by keyword we normally mean a key phrase – should be the bedrock of any SEO project.

In today’s online landscape getting your website found in Google is absolutely critical to the success – or failure – of your online business. There’s a great deal of detailed information out there regarding search engine optimisation but this article aims to boil the optimisation process down to its bare bones.

It is a basic guide to the key tenants of the optimisation process so we don’t go into the details of how to do it – this will give you the information to make the decision to either do it yourself or to outsource the work. It should also act as a good checklist to make sure you’re getting a proper service from any company you chose to use to manage your optimisation.

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